Idaho Statutes

Idaho Statutes are updated to the web July 1 following the legislative session.

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TITLE 67
STATE GOVERNMENT AND STATE AFFAIRS
CHAPTER 70
IDAHO SAFE BOATING ACT
67-7015.  Safety equipment — Additional regulations. (1) The department is hereby authorized to promulgate rules and regulations establishing equipment requirements for any vessel subject to the provisions of law. Regulations shall be, wherever possible, in conformity with the provisions of the federal navigation laws or with navigation rules and regulations promulgated by the United States coast guard and shall be modified from time to time to maintain that conformity.
(2)  It shall be unlawful for any person to operate or permit the operation of any vessel on the waters of the state of Idaho unless the vessel shall have on board or installed the equipment required by rules and regulations promulgated by the department.
(3)  Personal flotation devices required. Except for seaplanes and sailboards, no person may operate or permit to be operated any vessel on the waters of this state without carrying on board United States coast guard-approved personal flotation devices as described in this subsection.
(a)  Recreational vessels used for noncommercial use less than sixteen (16) feet in length and canoes and kayaks of any length must have one (1) United States coast guard-approved wearable personal flotation device of a suitable size for each person on board.
(b)  Recreational vessels sixteen (16) feet in length or longer must have one (1) United States coast guard-approved wearable personal flotation device of a suitable size for each person on board and, in addition, one (1) United States coast guard-approved throwable device.
(c)  Commercial vessels less than forty (40) feet in length not carrying passengers for hire must have at least one (1) United States coast guard-approved wearable personal flotation device of a suitable size for each person on board.
(d)  Commercial vessels carrying passengers for hire and commercial vessels forty (40) feet in length or longer not carrying passengers for hire must have at least one (1) United States coast guard-approved wearable personal flotation device of a suitable size for each person on board.
(e)  Commercial vessels twenty-six (26) feet in length or longer must have at least one (1) United States coast guard-approved throwable device in addition to other requirements.
(f)  Children fourteen (14) years of age and younger, on board vessels nineteen (19) feet or less, must wear a United States coast guard-approved flotation device when the vessel is underway.
(g)  All personal flotation devices must be readily accessible to persons on board and be of good and serviceable condition. When aboard a personal watercraft, including a Jet Ski, wave runner, etc., or being towed by a boat, including a water ski, wakeboard, kneeboard, tube, etc., an approved flotation device must be worn to be considered readily accessible. All such devices must be approved by the United States coast guard and must be marked in accordance with United States coast guard standards.
(4)  Exemptions to subsection (3) of this section are racing shells, rowing sculls, and racing kayaks provided they are manually propelled, recognized by a national or international racing association, and designed solely for competitive racing. Float tubes are exempt from the requirements of this chapter while being operated on lakes and reservoirs of this state less than two hundred (200) surface acres in size at natural or ordinary high water.
(5)  Fire extinguishers required. Except seaplanes and those motorboats less than twenty-six (26) feet in length propelled by outboard motors of open construction that will not permit the entrapment of explosive or flammable gases or vapors and not carrying passengers for hire, no person may operate or permit to be operated any motorboat on the waters of this state unless it carries on board and has readily accessible at least the minimum number of serviceable United States coast guard-approved extinguishers. Extinguishers approved for use on motorboats are hand portable of either B-I or B-II classification. "B" type is for gasoline, oil, and grease fires. "I" and "II" denotes size.
(6)  Inspections. Dry chemical fire extinguishers without gauges or indicating devices must be inspected every six (6) months. If the gross weight of a carbon dioxide (CO2) fire extinguisher is reduced by more than ten percent (10%) of the net weight, the extinguisher is not acceptable and must be recharged.
(7)  Specific requirements. The requirements for fire extinguishers by length of motorboat are:
(a)  At least one (1) B-1 fire extinguisher for boats less than twenty-six (26) feet in length;
(b)  At least two (2) B-1 fire extinguishers for boats twenty-six (26) feet to less than forty (40) feet in length;
(c)  At least three (3) B-1 fire extinguishers for boats forty (40) feet to not more than sixty-five (65) feet in length; and
(d)  The minimum federal requirement for boats sixty-five (65) feet in length or longer.
(8)  Alternative fire extinguisher requirement. One (1) B-II fire extinguisher may be substituted for two (2) B-I fire extinguishers. When a fixed fire extinguishing system is installed in machinery space(s), one (1) fewer B-I fire extinguisher is required.
(9)  Motorized vessels less than sixty-five and six-tenths (65.6) feet in length must exhibit navigation lights. No person may operate or permit the operation of any vessel on the waters of this state between sunset and sunrise or in other times of restricted visibility unless the vessel is equipped with and displays the lights specified in this section, and during such time no other lights that may be mistaken for those prescribed must be exhibited.
(a)  A white light placed over the fore and aft centerline of the vessel showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of two hundred twenty-five (225) degrees (twenty (20) points) and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to twenty-two and five-tenths (22.5) degrees (two (2) points) abaft (toward the stern from) the beam on either side of the vessel.
(b)  A white light placed as nearly as practicable at the stern showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon one hundred thirty-five (135) degrees (twelve (12) points) and so fixed as to show the light sixty-seven and five-tenths (67.5) degrees (six (6) points) from right aft on each side of the vessel.
(c)  On the starboard side a green light and on the port side a red light each showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of one hundred twelve and five-tenths (112.5) degrees (ten (10) points) and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to twenty-two and five-tenths (22.5) degrees (two (2) points) abaft (toward the stern from) the beam on its respective side. These sidelights may be combined in one (1) lantern carried on the fore and aft centerline of the vessel.
(d)  A motorboat less than thirty-nine and four-tenths (39.4) feet in length may exhibit a white light aft visible all around the horizon in lieu of the white lights prescribed in this chapter.
(10) Nonmotorized vessels. A sailboat, under sail alone, and a vessel under oars or paddles must exhibit navigation lights.
(a)  On the starboard side a green light and on the port side a red light each showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of one hundred twelve and five-tenths (112.5) degrees (ten (10) points) and so fixed as to show the light from right ahead to twenty-two and five-tenths (22.5) degrees (two (2) points) abaft (toward the stern from) the beam on its respective side. These sidelights may be combined in one (1) lantern carried on the fore and aft centerline of the vessel.
(b)  A white light placed as nearly as practicable at the stern showing an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon one hundred thirty-five (135) degrees (twelve (12) points) and so fixed as to show the light sixty-seven and five-tenths (67.5) degrees (six (6) points) from right aft on each side of the vessel.
(11) A sailboat of less than twenty-three (23) feet in length or a vessel under oars or paddles must, if practicable, exhibit the lights prescribed in this chapter; if it does not, it must have ready at hand an electric torch or lighted lantern showing a white light that must be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent collision.
(12) Anchorage. All vessels must display a white light visible all around the horizon when anchored on the waters of this state, unless anchored in a designated mooring area.
(13) Seaplanes. Where it is impracticable for a seaplane to exhibit lights of the characteristics or in the positions prescribed in this chapter, it must exhibit lights as similar in characteristics and position as is possible.
(14) Sailboats. Between sunrise and sunset, a vessel proceeding under sail when also being propelled by machinery must exhibit forward where it can best be seen a conical shape, apex downward. A vessel of less than thirty-nine and four-tenths (39.4) feet in length is not required to exhibit this shape but may do so.
(15) Visibility. Every white light prescribed by this chapter must be of such character as to be visible at a distance of at least two (2) miles. Every other colored light must be fitted with inboard screens of sufficient height so set as to prevent these lights from being seen across the bow and must be of such character as to be visible at least one (1) mile. As used in this chapter, "visible" means visible on a dark night with a clear atmosphere.
(16) Alternative lights and shapes. In lieu of the lights and shapes required in this chapter, a vessel may exhibit those lights and shapes provided for by federal law.
(17) Ventilation required. Except seaplanes, no person may operate or permit to be operated any vessel having aboard a gasoline engine used for any purpose, unless it is provided with proper ventilation.
(18) Compartments with gasoline engines. Each compartment in a vessel that has a permanently installed gasoline engine with a cranking motor must be open to the atmosphere or be ventilated by a natural ventilation system and a mechanical exhaust blower system as required by federal law.
(19) Collection of vapors or gases. Each compartment or tank in a vessel that may permit the entrapment of explosive or flammable gases or vapors must be ventilated by a natural ventilation system.
(20) Natural ventilation system. A natural ventilation system must be approved for use by the United States coast guard and include a supply opening or duct from the atmosphere or from a ventilated compartment, or from a compartment that is open to the atmosphere, and an exhaust opening into another ventilated compartment or an exhaust duct to the atmosphere. Each exhaust opening or duct must originate in the lower third of the compartment and each supply opening or duct and each exhaust opening or duct in a compartment must be above the normal accumulation of bilge water. Each supply opening must be forward facing and located on the exterior surface of a vessel or be constructed so that air effectively flows into or out of the supply or exhaust openings.
(21) Exhaust blowers. Each vessel that is required to have an exhaust blower must have a label that is located as close as practicable to each ignition switch, is in plain view of the operator, and has at least the words: "WARNING — GASOLINE VAPORS CAN EXPLODE. BEFORE STARTING ENGINE, OPERATE BLOWER FOR FOUR (4) MINUTES AND CHECK ENGINE COMPARTMENT BILGE FOR GASOLINE VAPORS."
(22) Alternative ventilation system. In lieu of the ventilation and warning label required in this chapter, a vessel may be provided with any type of ventilating system allowed by federal law.
(23) Sound-producing devices. No person may operate or permit to be operated any vessel on the waters of this state without carrying on board sound-producing devices. A vessel of thirty-nine and four-tenths (39.4) feet or longer must be provided with a whistle or horn capable of making the prescribed signals provided for by federal law and a bell. The whistle or horn must be audible for at least one-half (1/2) nautical mile, and the bell, when struck, must produce a clear bell-like tone of full sound characteristic. A vessel of less than thirty-nine and four-tenths (39.4) feet in length must be provided with a whistle or horn capable of making the prescribed signals provided for by federal law. The whistle or horn must be audible for at least one-half (1/2) nautical mile.
(24) Backfire flame control. Except seaplanes, no person may operate or permit to be operated any motorboat on the waters of this state unless each carburetor on every inboard gasoline engine installed in a motorboat is equipped with a United States coast guard-approved backfire flame arrestor or other means of backfire flame control approved for use by the United States coast guard, each of which is securely attached to the carburetor and in proper working order.
(25) Neither the owner of a vessel livery nor his agent or employee may permit any vessel permitted by him to be operated as a vessel to depart from his premises unless it has been provided, either by owner or renter, with the equipment required in this chapter.

History:
[67-7015, added 1986, ch. 207, sec. 2, p. 525; am. 2022, ch. 218, sec. 6, p. 718.]


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